Foraging ecology, reproductive biology, and systematics of the red fig-eating bat (Stenoderma rufum) in the tabonuco rain forest of Puerto Rico

TitleForaging ecology, reproductive biology, and systematics of the red fig-eating bat (Stenoderma rufum) in the tabonuco rain forest of Puerto Rico
Publication TypeThesis
Year of Publication1991
AuthorsGannon, MR
DegreePhD
Number of Pages189
UniversityTexas Tech University
Accession NumberLUQ.180
Keywordsmonitoring protocol
Abstract

The mental health field faces a steadily increasing demand for services and traditional methods seem unlikely to meet that demand. The search for more effective and more efficient approaches to mental health problems has intensified. Increased use of paraprofessionals and nonprofessionals has resulted along with attempts to develop improved, cost-effective and time-efficient techniques. One such approach has been training parents to use behavior modification techniques to deal with their children's behavior problems, Parent-Child Interaction Training (PCIT) is one program designed to teach parents general techniques for modifying parent-child interaction patterns. This approach attempts to establish mutually-rewarding relationships, while decreasing children's noncompliant and maladaptive behaviors through the use of positive and negative behavioral consequences. Research into the most effective use and application of PCIT has only recently gained momentum, particularly that focusing on the acquisition of the behavior modification skills by the parents. One area of promise may be the utilization of videotape modeling in PCIT. The present study examined the relative effectiveness of traditional live modeling versus videotape modeling of skills taught in PCIT. Mothers were taught PCIT skills through one of the two modes of presentation. Performance before and after treatment was analyzed to determine if there was a difference between presentation modes. Results indicated no difference in effect between the two presentation modes and neither yielded significant effects. However, when presentation form was ignored, PCIT training produced changes. However, methodological compromises preclude any assured inference from these findings and a less equivocal replication is warranted before firm conclusions can be drawn, Nonetheless, the promise of videotape-mediated enhancement of parenting skills remains a viable question.

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